COSI’s Lost Egypt Exhibition


The Pieces are Coming Together! by COSI
February 6, 2009, 10:13 am
Filed under: Construction News | Tags: , ,

Author: Carli

I went to the Science Museum of Minnesota (SMM) last week to check out the exhibit components for Lost Egypt, accompanied by our VP of Experiences, Steve Langsdorf, and Senior Director of Design, Erik Burdock. While COSI is the official “producer” of the exhibit, we have tremendous help from our partners at SMM in building the actual experiences, creating the large structures, and putting all the pieces together.

Mummy reflective room

It’s been almost a year since this blog began with our trip to Egypt to collect the information, take photos and video, and conduct interviews. So the anticipation of walking into the warehouse at SMM to see the exhibit components come to life was really a thrill. As we entered the warehouse, we could see the giant canopy tents, and I knew I wouldn’t be disappointed. One of my favorite pictures from the trip was of the young niece and nephew of our Egyptologist guide wandering among the towering pillars of Karnak Temple; their tiny hands tightly gripped together, and anxious faces staring up at the columns. It was a beautiful juxtaposition of modern-day children consumed by the power of these ancient structures. My heart nearly skipped a beat, when I saw the picture again. Only now, it was a life-size canvas mural, built into the walls of the exhibit, that would allow the entire world to experience what we saw.

Exhibit wall with murals

The SMM team lead us through each component of the exhibit, and we tried out a few of the interactives including the rock challenge, where guests will be able to test the technologies that may have been used to move the enormous stones used to the build the pyramids. We also tested the Sands of Time Aeolian Landscape, showing how sites in Egypt are lost under the changing sands. And tried the pottery re-construction, which was a 3-dimensional pottery puzzle that made my head spin! The most exciting structure we saw was the pseudo-tomb hallway with reconstructions of artwork and hieroglyphics, dimly lit to reflect the actual insides of the tombs.

Art & heiroglyphics on the 'tomb wall'

And I couldn’t help but be in awe of the engineers who were working on what will eventually be the climate-controlled display cases for the artifacts, animal mummies, and human mummy. The intricacy of design, material specifications, and other rules and regulations for construction in order to put these priceless artifacts on display was mind boggling.

Future Mummy case

All in all, it was a fascinating trip, and I really think the city of Columbus will have something to be proud of when the exhibit finally arrives and opens this summer!

Advertisements

2 Comments

“One of my favorite pictures from the trip was of the young niece and nephew of our Egyptologist guide wandering among the towering pillars of Karnak Temple; their tiny hands tightly gripped together, and anxious faces staring up at the columns.”

It would be really nice if we could see this at a scale where the children show up.

Comment by George R. Stilwell, Jr.

George,

Our original intent was to link these photos to the high-res versions on Flickr. Sorry that we got the URLs mixed up and linked to the same size image instead! By clicking on the images now, you should be able to view high-res versions that we hope will help you better see what you were looking for.

Comment by COSI




Comments are closed.



%d bloggers like this: